Wednesday, 30 June 2021

Published Wednesday, June 30, 2021 with 0 comment

EQ – Key To Sports Success?


Your child is regular with their practice and training, is eating the right diet is also passionate about the sport, is it enough to take them to the next level?

Well, both yes and no.

While training and diet take care of the physical aspect of the game, and passion takes care of the attitude, there is an enormous need for emotional intelligence too. Everything that goes in and around the child’s life, has an intense effect on their minds which influences all they do. Negative emotions, anxiety, insecurity and depression cause lack of focus, loss of mind-muscle control and an overall drop in energy.

Children cannot choose what happens around them, but they can choose how they react to it. Emotional intelligence helps children manage negativity around them and stay composed no matter what.

The child will need your help in augmenting their emotional quotient. Here’s how you can help them:

 

It’s okay to be upset

We all have our fair share of emotional ups and downs. Just because you cannot understand or relate to your child’s dramatic reaction to their situation, doesn’t mean it’s not real. Don’t try and undermine their emotions, don’t tell them to subdue them either. The first step to managing emotions is acknowledging them. Teach your child to understand and point-out what exactly they are going through – anger, anxiety, frustration, disappointment, pain, or something else. Once they know what it is, it will be easier for them to manage it.

 

Expression matters

It’s important to tell your kids how to express their feelings. You will need to be very patient while telling the kids that they cannot express anger by throwing things or screaming. Encourage them to talk about it, maybe cry a little and move on. This behaviour will need to be modelled. You cannot yell or shout either if you don’t want your child to do it. It’s true for kids as much as it’s true for adults – it’s okay to be upset.

 

Reaction matters too

Explain there are repercussions to every action and reaction. Exaggerated, dramatic reactions may lead to regret or even shame later. Encourage children to time to consciously feel the emotion, and when the feeling is settled, they should talk to a trusted adult. Again, supressing emotions is not the right way to deal with it, the more appropriate approach is controlling the reaction.  For instance, if child gets very angry, teach them to contain their response and not get into arguments or fist fights, instead take deep breaths and calmly walk away , sit alone and think about the situation rationally. It’ll also help to try and understand the other person’s perspective too – why did they do what they did. They also need to learn to channel their emotions – a coloring book, music or anything they love to do.

 

Learning coping and problem-solving

Developing emotional intelligence also includes knowing how to solve the problem that’s worrying you. For instance, if the child is angry because they are being bullied by their classmates, tell them stories of how different people coped with bullying in their school, neighbourhood or even about adults in their office. Telling them several stories will help them understand that there are several ways to deal with a particular problem. Alternatively, make them brainstorm all possible solutions they think there can be. They then need to choose how they want to solve their problem.

 

It’s a process

Developing emotional intelligence is not a one-time exercise, it’s a process. There will be emotional highs and lows, especially during adolescence. Every problem should be an opportunity to learn a new emotional skill, and develop a more stable, sensible and intelligent emotional self.

 

 

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