Wednesday, 31 October 2018

Published Wednesday, October 31, 2018 with 0 comment

Youth Sports: Recovering From Sports Injury


Most parents, who are just about begging their journey in organized sports, fear that their child might get injured. If you are a freshman parent in the world of sports, here’s a disclaimer - in organized sports your child will be prone to injury, more than just regular scrapes and bumps of an active childhood. Sports and injury go together, it’s a part of the package. Sprained ankles, bruised bones, torn muscles, strains, concussions, all of these are unsurprising in sports, no matter how much of precaution and safety measures you might take.

While you can’t do much to prevent the injury, you can help manage it. More so, in youth sports, unlike college sports, you do not get dedicated medical staff or sports medicine specialists, which pretty much makes it the parents’ onus to get their child the right treatment and on the right recovery regime.

Although recovery time and plan can vary given the severity of the injury, here are a few points that might help build an injury management and recovery plan just in case.

1.     For any physical injury, you must first see a doctor. Even if the injury initially seems harmless, it’s always recommended you see a doctor just to be on the safe side. Mostly, your family doctor or your pediatrician should be able to help diagnose the problem, then depending on the nature and severity of the injury, you might want to consult a specialist.

2.     While you are seeing a doctor who’s helping the child get cured, you must also consult a doctor who specializes in sports medicine or a physiotherapist, who will then put together a plan of recovery, how to get the motion and strength back, and how to swing back in action.

3.     Ask doctors and specialists about the time the child needs to take off. Let the child take complete rest during this period. This will help in healing faster. And when the child is ready to be back in motion, slowly introduce strengthening exercises, obviously under supervision of a sports medicine specialist or a physiotherapist.

4.     If the child’s injury is severe, most likely the child will have to go through physical rehab training. Be very patient. Physical rehab training can be very painful, the child would need your full support. It would take time to regain the strength and endurance back, and may take a while to get confidence back too.

5.     There will have to be a special diet during the time of recovery. If your child is really serious about his sport, you should consult a nutritionist to understand the type of diet your child would need. You can also seek advice from the doctor regarding the diet, but consulting a nutritionist will help you understand the exact diet plan to follow since recovery time is critical.

6.     Even after recovery, you should continue some strengthening exercises daily. Make it a routine. The recovered area would need extra strength.

Kids are just keen about getting back to playing. They would usually not follow the discipline required to recover completely. You would have to be there to ensure there is no hurried return to the game. If the recovery is not complete, there is a chance it may occur gain, since the body is vulnerable.



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