Thursday, 25 October 2018

Published Thursday, October 25, 2018 with 0 comment

How Parents Can Stay Involved in Youth Sports


Being involved in your little one’s sport program can be an exhilarating experience. You get to accompany the child everywhere and the kid loves it too. But as the child grows up, being involved in her life becomes tricky. Middle and high school kids, kind of discourage their parents accompanying them everywhere, asking them any questions about the game, school or anything in their lives. Ironically, around this time kids need parental supervision all the more, since they are entering delicate phase in their lives. Parents constantly live in this dilemma whether or not to show too much of eagerness towards your teen’s game, how much would be too much. It’s a tough one.

If you are struggling with a similar situation, here are a few tips wherein you can get positively involved in your teen’s sports without suffocating the kid’s personal space.

Read all emails from the coach or team

This is a lot helpful when you are keen on knowing what’s going on. If the main mode of communication is emails, make sure you read all the emails. This way you will not miss out on important dates, match schedules and other information. If your team uses an app, download it and be an active participant. Most of the times children feel parents are not interested. If you know the important stuff, you can help your child prepare accordingly, or help make car pool arrangements, which the child will eventually appreciate.

Be there on the important days

Given your hectic life and job, it might get difficult to attend all games, but make sure you do not miss the important ones. Be there for parent-coach meetings. These things matter to kids. If you aren’t around the kid might not trust you as much and sharing would be all the more difficult.

Understand mood swings can be because of stress

Teens go through a lot of stress these days, way more than most of them can handle at that tender age. There’s bullying, peer pressure, exam stress, depression, addiction, so much to cope up with. While your child is trying to keep her head above water, she may have some mood swings. Do not react to those. Let the moment pass. It doesn’t imply that you take bad attitude, back answering and tantrums; those definitely need to be corrected. But tell it to your child in a polite but firm manner whatever is not acceptable. Beyond that, just let the kid go through it, chances are she will only realize your silent support and come to you with her problem.

Have rational conversations with your child

Try and have intelligible adult-like conversations with her. Discuss some situations you might be going through in your life. Do not always try and tell her what’s right and what’s wrong, give her the mental and emotional space to figure that out on her own. just make sure you stay connected, with conversations or just by asking what’s going on or even by taking advise if you have to.

Get to know her friends and their parents

What company your kid is in matters a lot. Try and meet up with other parents in the team, organize some event or get-together. Knowing other kids and their parents will help you understand where your child is. It also builds at sense of security around the child.

Do not parent-coach

The team has a coach. Let the coach do his job. When you interfere with coaching, you end up spoiling the kid’s trust on the coach, or on you, which is worse.

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