Friday, 9 June 2017

Published Friday, June 09, 2017 with 0 comment

How to Have a Positive Sports Experience


Have you lately been to game of your child where some yelling parent irritated the whole crowd? Or even worse, you were the one yelling and later are embarrassed at your behavior, or your kid is? It happens to a lot of parents. But that’s not what the youth sports is supposed to make of you. Youth sports is supposed to be enriching participation for proud parents and a positive learning experience for the kid. Soft traits that the child picks up in youth sports training are as important as game skills.Similarly, being involved and being able to contribute towards your child’s life learning, can be a delightful opportunity for the parent. So, every time you get carried away with your emotions, remind yourself, you could be ruining the whole ‘positive game experience for her and for yourself too.

Here are a few tips to help you control your emotional outbursts and have a positive sports experience, for you and your child too.

Think of the embarrassment you might be causing

There’s a difference between cheering and yelling. While the first may motivate the kid, the former might disturb, or cause embarrassment, or both. This emotion goes a long way. 11-year-old Ben got so disturbed by his father’s yelling on the stands that he developed social anxiety disorder, and required counseling to come out of it. Think of all those times when we were publically embarrassed by our parents’ behavior; it’s the same feeling or worse if your kid is sensitive.

Be an example you’d want your child to learn from

Children take after their parents. Take it with a pinch of salt. Everything, from your behavior to your reaction to situations to your take on people or your stance in life, your kids are picking up cues from all of it. While most kids pick up the ‘Dos’ in life, some smart kids pick up the ‘Don’ts’ in life leaning from their parents’ behavior, and in both the situations, the parent is at a loss. So, while you are so dedicated to your kid’s future, you might just want to do it right.

You, your kid and the coach, all are in the same team

Never put the entire blame on the coach if something goes wrong or you are not satisfied with something, definitely not in front of the child. First thing you need to bear in mind is that you and coach are both on the same team and are focusing on the same goal. There can be differences of opinion or suggestions, which can be talked and settled, but playing a blame game is really bad idea. If you lose faith on the coach, and if the kid loses faith on the coach, most certainly the whole objective of sports training will be a waste.
Create happy memories around games


Irrespective if the game was a loss or a win, cheer your kid, tell them you are so proud of her and you are happy she’s learning so much. Go out for an ice-cream or spend some fun time on your way back from the game. This will take the pressure off your kid’s head, and you’ll have a great bonding together. Good memories will create positive energy which will reflect in the kid’s performance.
      edit

0 comments:

Post a Comment