Friday, 30 June 2017

Published Friday, June 30, 2017 with 0 comment

Tips for Parents to Handle Unruly Kids


Kids these days are so stressed and strained that they generally take to extreme behaviors, like aggression. Sports kids have that added pressure that can push them to the edge.

For parents, handling such kids is a big challenge. Although, there can no one-medicine that can cure this menace because different kids need to be handled differently, but here are a few general tips that can come in handy for parents to help them tackle unruly kids.

·        Do not try to control your child’s behavior or reaction. Control yours. You want the child to behave herself but you are the one who’s raising their voice, it will never work. Not for you, not for your child.

·        If you keep a calm and cool tone while arguing with your child, chances are the child will mellow down too. If you talk loud, the kid will talk louder to match it, or worse, will just walk away. End of discussion. But if you reason it out, hear the kid out, there is a fair chance either of you will agree, which is the best outcome that can be, for the family.

·        The minute you point a finger at your kid, she becomes defensive. The whole game changes. It becomes power struggle. Forget who’s leading. Keep your focus on the discussion, the motive why you are having this discussion in the first place. For instance, if your 14-year-old wants to go for a party, and you are not sure about sending her for you think there might be alcohol, keep your focus on your concern. Do not drag the discussion to studies and friends and college and everything else.

·        There are chances that you might be over reacting because of stress, chronic anxiety or sickness. Give that discount to your child also. Kids have their own pressures and tensions, which in their world are huge. So, if you think the child is over-reacting, think about what might be causing it.

·        Hear your child out. Listening is the best communication. It will also help build a positive connection between you and your child.

·        Think of your kid as a person, and not as an extension of you. The kid may not necessarily have the same personality traits, likes and dislikes as you. Accept it. And stop expecting the kid to become like you.


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Thursday, 29 June 2017

Published Thursday, June 29, 2017 with 0 comment

Getting Settled After Sports Break


Kids who have enjoyed a well-deserved sports break are usually enthusiastic about getting back in the action. Mostly, it is the parents who dread getting back into the hectic routine. If you are one of those parents, here’s a little help to get you started.

To begin with, do not feel guilty for dreading the starting of kid’s youth sports program. During the break, life is a tad bit easier for both, you and your child. It is just natural to resist getting in a rigid schedule, waking up early, getting to school, going to practices, diet regime, game days and so much more. Responsibilities increase, time demands increase, workload increases and commitment also increases. It’s definitely not an easy task.

Your task just gets even tougher when your kid isn’t enthused about it too. In that case, convincing the kid and managing her becomes a challenge.

Before the kid re-starts youth sports program, you need to talk to the child and let her know what would be different this year. Understand what is it that she wants to make the sports year a successful and memorable one. Ask her to list the following:

·        Ask the child if she has problems with the team, coach or anything else. Once the problem is pinpointed, a solution will come out naturally.
·        Ask your child if there is anything that can be changed to make the game or team better. You’ll be pleasantly surprised how clearly your child thinks.
·        Set hopes or goals for a successful sports year. List down all the things she wants to make it a great year full of achievement and learnings.

For parents, it will be challenging to get started with the rigorous routine, and considering that you child has grown by one year now, responsibilities will also increase. But it’s important that parents show enthusiasm and excitement for starting the sports routine back, because parents need to set the right example for kids. If you are still apprehensive, here are few things you can try:

·        Try and make a group of a few parents who can co-ordinate and share responsibilities, including carpool. It’s a win-win for everyone.
·        Create a time table, both for your child and for yourself. This way wasting time trying to figure out ‘what to do next’ will be minimized.
·        Try and socialize with other sports parents in the team; it would help in team bonding and moreover, it becomes kind of like a support group, that stands by each other in the thick or thin.

Since this transition from one sports-year to the next you are doing with your child, you share the same level of inertia. Getting started will be difficult. But the right start can make noticeable difference in your kid’s game. Remember in sports, attitude is more important than aptitude. 
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Thursday, 15 June 2017

Published Thursday, June 15, 2017 with 0 comment

Be The Parent Your Child Needs





Are you a parent whose kid is in youth sports? Do you meet other co-parents who have issues with the coach, the team administration or the whole athletic department of the school?

Well, the answer in all probability is, almost every single day.

The real problem is not that the coach, admin or the athletic department, although there might be room for development there; the real problem is that all of us have risen our expectations (and our egos). A coach has to be sensitive to child’s feelings (and the parents’ ego), so he cannot raise his voice in the game. He has to keep his tone appropriately moderated. “Coaching youth sports is an emotional experience. High passion and drama make the game worth it. You don’t get passionate players with moderation. It’s like robots playing in the field”, says Jim McNelly, an elementary school coach.

At the same time, kids are facing a problem because their parents and coaches have high expectations from them. Every parent wants their child to win. Every coach wants the team to win. For an athlete who is average, life becomes tough. For an athlete who’s good, it gets even more tougher. The sheer pressure of high expectations increases so much, that some kids even give up, forever.

And then there is the expectation of excellence. Parents and coaches have set the bar of expectations so high, that they do not settle for average skills. Every child who loves to play may not necessarily be a star athlete, but that does not call for taking the game away from that kid. Coaches want only the best players in their team. If you have recently been to a tryout, you must have seen the fierce competition kids are exposed to. It’s almost cruel.

But the problem is that, this is the reality. This is the world our children will live in. So how do we bring our children up differently. It would not be practically possible to ask kids not to be competitive or not push them to try beyond their abilities. Nor would it be wise to bring up your kids in a haven bubble.

Either of the extremes is dangerous. Being too competitive and victory obsessed has its repercussions. But then, lack of positive aggression has it’s lows too.


A good thing to do is, to flow with what the child is comfortable with. There are kids who have an in-born talent for something. Be the parent who sees the talent and lets the child use it. Some child might be naturally aggressive. Be the parent who helps the child use that aggression positively. A child might just be a beautiful human being from inside. Instead of killing her soul and trying to make her excel in something the child has no interest in, be the parent who lets this child be. Instead of forcing your aspirations on the kid, be the parent who lets the child spread their own wings and choose their own sky.
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Saturday, 10 June 2017

Published Saturday, June 10, 2017 with 0 comment

Football Cleats on Sale


Looking for football cleats for your kid? Here are some top selling brands that have discounts on these cleats. Hurry, so that you don’t miss out on the discounts. To get an even better deal, try the shoe in the store and look for coupons online. Buy online or in-store depending on the place offering a better deal. 



New Balance Kids' 4040 V3 Baseball Cleats





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WAS: $44.99


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Nike Kids' Alpha Shark 2 Mid Football Cleats



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Under Armour Kids' Renegade RM Football Cleats






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Nike Kids' Strike Shark Football Cleats








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Under Armour Kids' Renegade RM Wide Football Cleats





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Nike Force Savage Shark Snake (BG) Youth's Football Cleats


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Nike Force Savage Shark (BG) Youth's Football Cleats



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Under Armour Hammer Mid RM Jr. Youth's Football Cleats





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Friday, 9 June 2017

Published Friday, June 09, 2017 with 0 comment

How to Have a Positive Sports Experience


Have you lately been to game of your child where some yelling parent irritated the whole crowd? Or even worse, you were the one yelling and later are embarrassed at your behavior, or your kid is? It happens to a lot of parents. But that’s not what the youth sports is supposed to make of you. Youth sports is supposed to be enriching participation for proud parents and a positive learning experience for the kid. Soft traits that the child picks up in youth sports training are as important as game skills.Similarly, being involved and being able to contribute towards your child’s life learning, can be a delightful opportunity for the parent. So, every time you get carried away with your emotions, remind yourself, you could be ruining the whole ‘positive game experience for her and for yourself too.

Here are a few tips to help you control your emotional outbursts and have a positive sports experience, for you and your child too.

Think of the embarrassment you might be causing

There’s a difference between cheering and yelling. While the first may motivate the kid, the former might disturb, or cause embarrassment, or both. This emotion goes a long way. 11-year-old Ben got so disturbed by his father’s yelling on the stands that he developed social anxiety disorder, and required counseling to come out of it. Think of all those times when we were publically embarrassed by our parents’ behavior; it’s the same feeling or worse if your kid is sensitive.

Be an example you’d want your child to learn from

Children take after their parents. Take it with a pinch of salt. Everything, from your behavior to your reaction to situations to your take on people or your stance in life, your kids are picking up cues from all of it. While most kids pick up the ‘Dos’ in life, some smart kids pick up the ‘Don’ts’ in life leaning from their parents’ behavior, and in both the situations, the parent is at a loss. So, while you are so dedicated to your kid’s future, you might just want to do it right.

You, your kid and the coach, all are in the same team

Never put the entire blame on the coach if something goes wrong or you are not satisfied with something, definitely not in front of the child. First thing you need to bear in mind is that you and coach are both on the same team and are focusing on the same goal. There can be differences of opinion or suggestions, which can be talked and settled, but playing a blame game is really bad idea. If you lose faith on the coach, and if the kid loses faith on the coach, most certainly the whole objective of sports training will be a waste.
Create happy memories around games


Irrespective if the game was a loss or a win, cheer your kid, tell them you are so proud of her and you are happy she’s learning so much. Go out for an ice-cream or spend some fun time on your way back from the game. This will take the pressure off your kid’s head, and you’ll have a great bonding together. Good memories will create positive energy which will reflect in the kid’s performance.
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